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Invertebrate Brain Gallery

Many invertebrate animals have evolved a rich variety of brains (head ganglia). Unusually large brains of squids and octopuses and small but sophisticated brains of arthropods, especially those of insects, are among the most fascinating brains created on earth by natural selection. Here, photographs of invertebrates of 6 phyla, 35 orders and 47 species and those of their central nervous systems are presented, with brief explanations of their characteristics. Enjoy seeing the pictures and consider evolution of brains in invertebrates. These images can be only used for research and education freely. Providers (Dr. Makoto Mizunami) have copyright for images and documents.

Chilean rose tarantula Back to the top page of brain gallery
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Author Comment
Kuramochi
2006-04-12
18:18
Chilean rose tarantula/Grammostola rosea
Body length: 5 cm.
The Chilean rose tarantula (Grammostola rosea) is probably one of the most common species of tarantula kept in pet stores and is a common pet in the world today of spider pets. Originating from Chile (hence the name), they are popular as pets because they are relatively docile, are easy to keep, and are very beautiful.
Subesophageal, thoracic and abdominal ganglia are merged together and the cerebral ganglion sits on top of the merged structure. In other words, the central nervous systems converge into a single ganglion, sending peripheral nerves to numerous body parts such as sensory organs, muscles and internal organs.

Infomation

ID39
AuthorKuramochi
Date2006-04-12
SeqA08
Views3800
Keyword

Arthropoda
  • Arachnida
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