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Invertebrate Brain Gallery

Many invertebrate animals have evolved a rich variety of brains (head ganglia). Unusually large brains of squids and octopuses and small but sophisticated brains of arthropods, especially those of insects, are among the most fascinating brains created on earth by natural selection. Here, photographs of invertebrates of 6 phyla, 35 orders and 47 species and those of their central nervous systems are presented, with brief explanations of their characteristics. Enjoy seeing the pictures and consider evolution of brains in invertebrates. These images can be only used for research and education freely. Providers (Dr. Makoto Mizunami) have copyright for images and documents.

Lobster Back to the top page of brain gallery
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Author Comment
Kuramochi
2006-04-12
18:22
Lobster/Homarus americanus
Body length: 64 cm.
Lobsters live on rocky, sandy, or muddy bottoms from the shoreline to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. They generally live singly in crevices or in burrows under rocks. An average adult lobster is about 230 mm long and weighs 700 to 900 g. Lobsters grow throughout their lives and are long-lived. They can thus reach impressive sizes.
The anatomy of the lobster includes the cephalothorax, which is the head fused with the thorax, both of which are covered by the carapace, and the abdomen. Because a lobster lives in a murky environment at the bottom of the ocean, its vision is poor and it mostly uses its antennae as sensors.
The central nervous system consists of a relatively large brain, compartmentalized subesophageal ganglion, 5 thoracic ganglia and 6 abdominal ganglia.

Infomation

ID42
AuthorKuramochi
Date2006-04-12
SeqB04
Views3115
Keyword

Arthropoda
  • Crustacea
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