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Invertebrate Brain Gallery

Many invertebrate animals have evolved a rich variety of brains (head ganglia). Unusually large brains of squids and octopuses and small but sophisticated brains of arthropods, especially those of insects, are among the most fascinating brains created on earth by natural selection. Here, photographs of invertebrates of 6 phyla, 35 orders and 47 species and those of their central nervous systems are presented, with brief explanations of their characteristics. Enjoy seeing the pictures and consider evolution of brains in invertebrates. These images can be only used for research and education freely. Providers (Dr. Makoto Mizunami) have copyright for images and documents.

Spiketail Back to the top page of brain gallery
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Author Comment
Kuramochi
2006-04-12
18:27
Spiketail/ Anotogaster sieboldii
Body length: 6.8-8.0 cm.
Anotogaster sieboldii is the largest dragonflies in Japan. These dragonflies are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams. Female dragonflies lay eggs in or near water, often in or on floating or emergent plants. Most of the life cycle is spent in the larval (nymph) form, beneath the water surface, using internal gills to breathe, and catching other invertebrates or even vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish. Adult dragonflies typically eat mosquitoes, midges and other small insects like flies, bees, and butterflies.
The central nervous system consists of the brain, subesophageal ganglion, 3 thoracic ganglia and 7 abdominal ganglia. The most prominent region is its well-developed optic lobes, which process visual information from the compound eyes, located laterally to the brain. Dissection was extremely difficult due to the long and thin ventral nerve cord.

Infomation

ID44
AuthorKuramochi
Date2006-04-12
SeqC02
Views3144
Keyword

Arthropoda
  • Insecta
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