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Invertebrate Brain Gallery

Many invertebrate animals have evolved a rich variety of brains (head ganglia). Unusually large brains of squids and octopuses and small but sophisticated brains of arthropods, especially those of insects, are among the most fascinating brains created on earth by natural selection. Here, photographs of invertebrates of 6 phyla, 35 orders and 47 species and those of their central nervous systems are presented, with brief explanations of their characteristics. Enjoy seeing the pictures and consider evolution of brains in invertebrates. These images can be only used for research and education freely. Providers (Dr. Makoto Mizunami) have copyright for images and documents.

Spoon worm Back to the top page of brain gallery
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Author Comment
Kuramochi
2006-04-12
18:29
Spoon worm/ Urechis unicinctus
Body length: 10-30 cm.
Spoon worms, or echiurans, are a small group of marine animals, similar in size and habit to siphunclans. Many species, such as Echiurus, Urechis, and Ikeda, live in burrows in sand and mud. Echiurans are usually a drab gray or brown color. The body of an echiuran is composed of a sausage-shaped, cylindrical trunk and an anterior proboscis. The proboscis is a large, flattened projection of the head and cannot be retracted into the trunk.
The central nervous system consists of a ring-shaped ganglion, surrounding the esophagus, and ventral nerve cord. The main function of the nervous system is to control feeding and locomotion. Sensory organs are not apparent in the head, and this animal does not have a “brain” (cerebral ganglion).

Infomation

ID45
AuthorKuramochi
Date2006-04-12
SeqA01
Views6064
Keyword

Annelida
  • Echiura
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